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Research Luxembourg takes part in Beyond UNIVERSEH

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Beyond UNIVERSEH.

UNIVERSEH is an alliance of five higher education institutions aiming to develop new ways of collaboration in the field of space, within the “European Universities” initiative by the European Commission. The consortium recently launched Beyond UNIVERSEH, its Research pillar.

UNIVERSEH focuses on the development of educational activities and innovative collaborations in the European space sector.

The University of Luxembourg is a member of the UNIVERSEH consortium, which also includes Université Fédérale Toulouse Midi Pyrénées (France), Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf (Germany), Luleå tekniska universitet (Sweden) and AGH University of Science and Technology (Poland)

Strengthening Europe’s position in Space and new Space

Created in 2020 as part of the Erasmus+ “European Universities” initiative of the European Commission, UNIVERSEH has the potential to reach more than 140,000 students, researchers and staff.

Reflecting European values, it aims to facilitate mobility and multilingualism, promote student inclusion and diversity, support interdisciplinary programmes, and strengthen pedagogical innovation and entrepreneurship in Europe.

UNIVERSEH is developing an ambitious European programme to support the thriving ecosystem of space activities with the dynamic support of governmental and public bodies as well as of commercial players.

Beyond UNIVERSEH to develop a research policy roadmap for 2035 within the space sector

The main ambition of Beyond UNIVERSEH is to develop a research policy roadmap for 2035 and a vision for 2050 in the space sector. Such a roadmap will build a sustainable and integrated research and innovation network within the alliance and beyond.

The consortium will also create a unique shared and collaborative virtual lab and research community. As such, it has the potential to spearhead new collaborative and interdisciplinary methodologies to improve the outcomes of space research and innovation.

It will connect researchers and stakeholders from multiple backgrounds, promoting a highly multidisciplinary and cross-sector network to address the societal challenges of space and new space.

More about Beyond UNIVERSEH

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Industrial & Service Transformation Latest news

Research to empower companies’ space ambitions

New space movement.

Over the last three decades, Luxembourg has created a thriving scene of space activities where more than 50 companies have emerged.

The new space movement has given rise to a private sector making it possible for more and more businesses to reach for the stars.

Luxembourg has given priority to its space strategy. With its new space movement and a supportive institutional framework, the country provides start-ups with a conducive ecosystem.

The Computer Vision, Imaging & Machine Intelligence Research Group (CVI2) of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) – a research centre within the University of Luxembourg, aims to support businesses in making a breakthrough in space.

How research supports space companies

For many companies in the space industry, creating a team covering the whole spectrum of expertise can seem as difficult as rocket science.

With contributions needed in the areas of materials science, structural engineering, manufacturing and robotics, as well as in computer vision, research in Luxembourg offers a significant advantage to both start-ups and established entities, approaching projects from all angles.

With a team of interdisciplinary researchers, a computer vision lab and the Zero-G lab, SnT enables start-ups to make real progress, steering research in the right direction.

“Offering space companies the opportunity to partner with research to access broader expertise allows them not only to fill in the gaps, but also to focus their efforts on their core business.”

Prof. Djamila Aouada, head of the CVI2 research group and co-head of the Zero-G Lab at SnT

When Research Luxembourg and a start-up enter a ‘new space’ partnership

SnT and Lift Me Off have teamed up to develop technologies that will give service vehicles intelligent visual processing. The start-up is committed to the safe and sustainable use of space by exploring the fields of autonomous satellite services in orbit.

As a result of their collaboration, the SPARK simulator for orbital space detection emerged. This project is certainly one of the most important contributions of research to the Luxembourg space industry. Indeed, the application represents an important step forward in the design of deep learning algorithms for space applications. The simulator also includes target recognition in the critical area of space debris, as well as the complex business of position estimation.

While formally owned by SnT, the simulator has the potential to have a great impact on the sector, with a wide range of applications for future partnerships.

The Zero-G Lab – moving in absence of gravity

The Interdisciplinary Space Master’s Zero-G laboratory is designed to test the motion of orbital robotics, satellites and other spacecraft in a micro-gravity environment.

By seeing how spacecraft and orbital robotics can be controlled or operate with decoupled systems in this environment, researchers can explore, understand and predict their behaviour in space.

@Zero-G Lab – Interdisciplinary Space Master – University of Luxembourg

Read more about the Computer Vision, Imaging and Machine Intelligence Research Group.

More about SnT and Lift Me Off partnership.

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Research Luxembourg takes part in Beyond UNIVERSEH

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France-Luxembourg space cooperation to focus on exploration and resources

A first workshop between French government space agency CNES and Luxembourg Space Agency (LSA) identified joint initiatives aiming in particular to address the challenges and opportunities arising out of developments in space exploration. At the same time, LSA, the European Space Resources Innovation Centre (ESRIC) and Air Liquide, drawing on a 50-year heritage of handling…

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How satellite tech can power our new 5G world?

New SnT project, conducted in cooperation with leader in global content connectivity solutions SES, envisions a fundamental shift in the emerging 5G wireless system towards closer integration with satellite systems. Advancing data networks Integrating satellite and terrestrial systems is crucial as truly global next-generation networks require an ecosystem of multiple communication infrastructures to be inclusive, ubiquitous and affordable.…

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About Luxembourg Industrial & Service Transformation Latest news

France-Luxembourg space cooperation to focus on exploration and resources

Quadripartite agreement.

French government space agency CNES, the Luxembourg Space Agency, the European Space Resources Innovation Centre and Air Liquide confirmed their commitment to work together on developing research and technology activities. In the months ahead, the four partners will be collaborating on research projects encompassing space exploration and in situ resource utilisation.

A first workshop between French government space agency CNES and Luxembourg Space Agency (LSA) identified joint initiatives aiming in particular to address the challenges and opportunities arising out of developments in space exploration. At the same time, LSA, the European Space Resources Innovation Centre (ESRIC) and Air Liquide, drawing on a 50-year heritage of handling gases in space, engaged discussions with a view to collaborating on production and use of gases produced from in situ space resources.

Developing the space ecosystem

Multilateral discussions subsequently confirmed a shared interest in working together in areas such as in situ production and storage of oxygen and hydrogen, production and storage of hydrogen energy in space and on the lunar surface, technologies for life support, and the refueling of satellites and launchers in orbit.

ESRIC is a young initiative like no other in Europe, powered by LSA and the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST), with ESA as a strategic partner. We believe this new collaboration between France and Luxembourg will be instrumental in developing our centre and we’re delighted to be working with players like CNES and Air Liquide.”

Mathias Link, ad-interim Director of ESRIC

CNES, LSA, ESRIC and Air Liquide are in discussions to form within the 2022 timeframe joint teams to work on concrete research projects aimed at developing key technologies for in situ production and utilisation of gases required to make space exploration more viable in the long term.

These discussions come under the scope of the framework agreement signed between CNES and Luxembourg in 2009 that identifies a range of areas for cooperation including remote sensing, support for development of microsatellites by Luxembourg, innovative satellite technologies for telecommunications, materials analysis and expertise, and maritime safety.

Luxembourg, a space power

Luxembourg is a founding member of the Artemis Accords. As such the country plays central role in achieving a sustainable and robust presence on the Moon later this decade while preparing to conduct a historic human mission to Mars. These accords strengthen and put into effect the 1967 Outer Space Treaty.

The country is also home to the European Space Resources Innovation Centre (ESRIC), a joint initiative of the Luxembourg Space Agency and Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology with the European Space Agency as a strategic partner.

In 2017, Luxembourg took over as the first European country to provide a legal framework for Luxembourg-based companies to exploit space resources. This was further supported by legislation passed by the Luxembourg Parliament in December 2020.

Space-related research is part of the key research priorities, i.e. Industrial and Service Transformation. The University of Luxembourg and the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) focus on autonomous vehicles, robotics, space communications and system critical software, while LIST concentrates on material sciences, biological sciences, and Earth observing.

While waiting to go into space, see a lunar rover drive around on the moon in augmented reality with FNR LetzScience App

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How satellite tech can power our new 5G world?

Satellite tech and 5 G.

Luxembourg Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT), in cooperation with leader in global content connectivity solutions SES, is exploring how satellite technology can help enable our new 5G world — and how satellites can do even more to advance 5G capabilities.

New SnT project, conducted in cooperation with leader in global content connectivity solutions SES, envisions a fundamental shift in the emerging 5G wireless system towards closer integration with satellite systems.

Advancing data networks

Integrating satellite and terrestrial systems is crucial as truly global next-generation networks require an ecosystem of multiple communication infrastructures to be inclusive, ubiquitous and affordable. Satellite proved to be an ideal enabler of the next-generation networks thanks to its wide coverage, ability to deliver to moving platforms, and simultaneity. It will allow a broad range of next-generation connectivity scenarios, even in remote areas, for crucial applications in mobile backhauling, aero and maritime connectivity, emergency response, telemedicine, and much more. 

Connecting 5G to the satellite communications network will also contribute to guaranteeing that increasingly important technologies like the Internet of Things are as reliable as possible.

Building bridges between industry and research

Project INSTRUCT, which stands for INtegrated Satellite-TeRrestrial Systems for Ubiquitous Beyond 5G CommunicaTions, is an industry-led research partnership between SES and the SnT.

This project seeks to strengthen the links between the academic and industrial worlds. Building on ten years of collaborative research experience, INSTRUCT will initiate a long-term structured research programme between SnT and SES. Additionally, it will interconnect and expand the validation facilities of the joint laboratories available at SnT and SES.

Overall, INSTRUCT project will provide significant innovations in the area of High Performance Networks. It will also promote Luxembourg’s vision of being a global hub of space and satellite services.

In total, INSTRUCT includes 17 research projects.

“Each of the seventeen projects is being pursued by a team made up of an academic supervisor from SnT, an industry supervisor from SES, and either a doctoral or postdoctoral researcher.”


Prof. Dr. Symeon CHATZINOTAS
 Full Professor / Chief Scientist I and Co-Head of SIGCOM

SnT, University of Luxembourg

The project is supported by the Industrial Partnership Block Grant (IPBG) programme from the Luxembourg National Research Fund (FNR).

Read more about INSTRUCT

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Industrial & Service Transformation Latest news

Luxembourg lunar robotics to help create permanent base on the moon

Asteroid Day 2021.

Yearly global event Asteroid Day is taking place on 30 June 2021. In Luxembourg, Prof. Miguel Olivares-Mendez who heads the SpaceR Research Group, the LunaLab, and the Zero-Gravity Lab at the University of Luxembourg’s Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) is releasing a special video tour of the LunaLab.

On Asteroid Day, the Space Robotics Research Group (SpaceR) is giving a tour of LunaLab facility. The research group’s lunar robotics work could help create a permanent base on the moon by identifying the water-ice and minerals needed to build structures, sustain life, and manufacture rocket fuel locally at the new moon base.

The lunar base will serve as a much better launching point for future missions, as well as a new base for asteroid monitoring and observation. Once the base has been built, the work developing algorithms for lunar robots will go on to support further research and exploration of asteroids.

Robots to explore unreachable places for humans

Robotics is a disruptive technology that is making a lot more possible in space. Going forward, space exploration will involve some people, but it will likely involve a whole lot more robots.

In the future, there will be massive networks of smart robots and sophisticated communications systems. This is partly because keeping people alive and employed in space is expensive. Robots and their development are still much more affordable than astronauts. As such, robots can get work done without using up the limited resources available in an environment like the moon. Similarly, advancements in technologies like artificial intelligence can make robots smart enough to interpret and respond to these environments. This means that robots can explore places where we have limited information or poor access and expect them to perform their missions reasonably well with minimal investment and no risk to human life.

“With robots, we’ll be able to accomplish a lot more with a lot less — and we’ll be able to go to places that are completely inaccessible for people.”

Prof. Miguel Olivares-Mendez

Robots to become our interface with the cosmos

Asteroids are among the least accessible bodies in the solar system. Yet they are rich in resources that will be required to build other space projects. Ultimately, robots will be able to reach them and extract these resources.

Diverting asteroids from a collision path with Earth or mining asteroids for minerals will mean counting on small autonomous or semi-autonomous robots to get close to the asteroid.

“Robots, and especially autonomous robots, are going to become our interface with the cosmos. So my team is working on making sure that our robots are smart enough to live up to the task.”

Prof. Miguel Olivares-Mendez

Explore LunaLab 

The International Space Master’s LunaLab is one of the few facilities across the globe that simulates lunar conditions for testing applications such as autonomous navigation of lunar robots, multi-robot interaction, lunar surface extraction, manipulation and transportation, additive manufacturing and regolith analysis.

LetzSCIENCE , follow a lunar rover in augmented reality

LetzSCIENCE by Luxembourg National Research Fund (FNR) aims to raise awareness of research in Luxembourg. To reach people in Luxembourg in a new, innovative way, the campaign combines augmented reality with the beauty of science.

See a lunar rover drive around on the Moon around you in augmented reality with LetzSCIENCE App.

Asteroid Day is an educational and awareness programme. It aims to inform the world about asteroids: how they form, their role in our solar system and how we can protect our planet from impacts.

More about The Space Robotics Research Group (SpaceR) and LunaLab.

Read the complete interview of Prof. Miguel Olivares-Mendez

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Space Resources Week 2021

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@nasa

Exploring the origins and fate of lunar water

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Industrial & Service Transformation Latest news

Luxembourg: a thriving scene for Spaceneurship

Luxembourg has built a thriving space industry, currently comprised of 60 companies and research labs and including a growing number of firms that build solutions for the commercial exploration and utilisation of space resources. Approximately 800 employees work in the space sector in Luxembourg, in research and development, manufacturing and operation.

LuxSpace to enable space ambitions of both business leaders and institutions

Founded in 2006, microsatellite and integrated services specialist LuxSpace is a pioneer in the Luxembourg space sector. While its top-notch products enable a variety of space missions, the company thrives in the dynamic Luxembourg space ecosystem where public and private organisations cooperate to make space business happen.

With about 50 employees, LuxSpace is one of the largest space companies in Luxembourg. Its Managing Director, Edgar Milic, joined the company in early 2021 after 12 years at satellite giant SES, headquartered in Luxembourg. As such, he has seen the space sector grow from a rather small community to a dynamic ecosystem of around 60 businesses and research laboratories.

“This development is due to the inspiring vision of some politicians. They were willing to do what it takes to have the necessary tools in place for the space sector to grow.”

Edgar Milic, Managing Director, LuxSpace

In the last five years, Luxembourg has created a stimulating ecosystem dedicated to space.

Mr Milic points out that “the synergies between these instruments have created an enormously rewarding environment that attracts people and companies to Luxembourg.”

“It used to be scientists and engineers dreaming about space – today it is entrepreneurs.”

Edgar Milic, Managing Director, LuxSpace

Generating a talent pool of highly skilled engineers and innovative entrepreneurs

University of Luxembourg, in collaboration with the Luxembourg Space Agency, offers a two-year interdisciplinary Space Master programme. The aim of it is to generate a talent pool of highly skilled engineers and innovative entrepreneurs. Thus, the future talents will be able to create and manage leading commercial space enterprises.

Find out more about the programme.

In just three decades, the Luxembourg space sector has grown from nothing into probably the most dynamic in Europe. The country is building an environment encouraging space entrepreneurship to make space dreams real.

Excerpts from Luxembourg Trade & Invest’s Enabling space ambitions.

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Events Industrial & Service Transformation Inside Research Luxembourg Latest news

Space Resources Week 2021

The Space Resources Week 2021, organized in Luxembourg, is a 4-day online conference connecting thought leaders from the terrestrial resources sector, aerospace industry, financial institutions, research institutes and academia.

It aims at understanding the technical and economic challenges facing in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) and elaborating recommendations for the future development of this high technology sector.

Organized by the European Space Resources Innovation Center (ESRIC), in collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Luxembourg Space Agency (LSA), the program of the event will include a series of captivating talks and facilitated discussion sessions on the technologies, business models and next steps that will enable space resources utilization in support of sustained and sustainable human presence on the Moon and beyond.

Back to Space Ressources Week 2019

The Space Resources Week 2019 gathered experts from all around the world, working in fields as diverse as oil & gas, terrestrial mining, space, finance, and government.

Visit spaceresourcesweek.lu for more details.

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Latest news Sustainable & Responsible Development

Exploring the origins and fate of lunar water

Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST) is collaborating with institutes from Europe and abroad, for a more robust interpretation of lunar ‘soil’ analyses from samples beneath the surface in the South Pole region of the Moon. They are looking at how water ice molecules behave when changing from ice state to vapour state.

“That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind”.

This famous quote from Neil Armstrong, who in the late 1960s was the first man to walk on the Moon, has profoundly marked our history and knowledge. These first manned Apollo missions, however, led scientists to believe that the Moon was a bone-dry celestial body. It is only very recently that new exploration missions have revealed the existence of water ice pools in the polar regions of the Moon.

At the dawn of space mining missions, this discovery opens new horizons and raises new research questions, to which Veneranda López Días, researcher at LIST (Environmental Research and Innovation Department/ERIN), together with her colleagues at the ERIN and Materials Research and Technology departments, are trying to answer through pioneering projects with the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Luxembourg Space Agency (LSA).


Setting up a future lunar base could be made much simpler by using a 3D printer to build it from local materials. ©ESA/Foster + Partners

From a better understanding of lunar water behaviour…

In non-terrestrial environments, such as the Moon, only little is known about the water molecule’s behaviour. This information is nonetheless essential for a better understanding of lunar water sources and fate, and by extension, to identify if it could be a viable resource.

For filling pressing knowledge gaps on lunar water behaviour, Laurent Pfister, head of the ENVISION unit at LIST (ERIN), is leading an interdisciplinary team composed of experts in mass spectrometry from MRT and isotope hydrologists from ERIN. They contribute to ESA’s ambitious PROSPECT mission (Package for Resource Observation and in-Situ Prospecting for Exploration, Commercial exploitation and Transportation).

 “In the frame of the Luna 27 mission that will be launched in 2024/2025, we are collaborating with institutes from Europe and abroad, for a more robust interpretation of lunar ‘soil’ analyses from samples beneath the surface in the South Pole region of the Moon.”, explains Veneranda.

More specifically, and with the support of LSA, the LIST team conducts a pioneering project focusing on the isotope fractionation processes of Hydrogen (H) and Oxygen (O) stable isotopes during water ice sublimation under lunar environmental conditions. In other words, they are looking at how water ice molecules behave when changing from ice state to vapour state.

As a concrete example of application, the Permanently Shadowed Regions (PSRs) at the Moon poles act as cold traps, with temperatures down to -250°C, and collect any vapours that pass through the lunar environment. Hence, PSRs contain a fossil record of the early Solar System that could considerably improve the current state-of-the-art related to the lunar water cycle and the early solar system history.

… to space mining missions on the moon and beyond

“Progress in this respect will be of direct relevance and interest for space mining companies and scientists investigating the water cycle on the Moon and the origin of water delivered to the Earth-Moon system and its history.”, highlights Veneranda.

Water extraction and processing on the Moon is highly relevant for In-Situ Resource Utilisation (ISRU), since it serves as propelling, radiation shielding, thermal management and life-support consumables. It would therefore contribute to reduce the costs and complexity of bringing supplies from the Earth’s deep gravity well and settle the human presence on the Moon (Moon Village) as an intermediate base to prepare for future missions to Mars – or other destinations – but also to extend the space mining to asteroids.

Moreover, lessons learned from this project may eventually benefit water resources related research on earth. The expected findings and results shall help identifying synergies between terrestrial and non-terrestrial hydrology, for ultimately triggering new momentum in both planetary and Earth system sciences.

The interdisciplinarity of LIST as an asset

“Given that we explore mostly unploughed ground – both in terms of instrument development and exo-hydrological process understanding – this project is extremely challenging, but also all the more exciting.”, testify Laurent and Veneranda.

LIST’s researchers need to find innovative solutions to untackled problems related to the extraction of water and ice from lunar ‘soil’ samples. At the same time, they need to design and build devices that operate in an incredibly hostile and challenging environment – with very low temperatures and a very pronounced vacuum – and still capable of delivering the finest possible resolution in stable isotope measurements for O and H in ice. The new instruments, experimental data and process knowledge obtained from exo-hydrology research shall ultimately also reduce knowledge gaps that prevail in terrestrial hydrology – a field that remains measurement limited to date.

With its cohort of experts in multiple and yet highly complementary fields – spanning from hydrology, inorganic geochemistry, soil science, chemistry to physics – LIST offers a unique blend of qualities and skills that are required for facing such an extraordinary and galvanising challenge.

This article was originally published by the LIST

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Industrial & Service Transformation Latest news

Ultra-lightweight structures made in Luxembourg

The Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST) and the established Luxembourg company Gradel are joining forces by opening a joint Luxembourg Lab to research and produce ultra-lightweight structures for the aeronautics and space industry.  Parts will be produced for three European giants in satellite construction; Thales Alenia Space (France), Airbus Defence and Space (France), and OHB (Germany). This project holds great promises for the space sector and beyond, with potential applications in the automotive and aeronautic world. 

In the domain of space and satellites, weight is expensive. The heavier a product for transport into space is, the more it costs. In fact, the current estimate is costs of around €5,000-10,000 per kilogram, meaning that any weight loss is beneficial financially for companies sending satellites into space.

The LIST/Gradel joint effort aims to produce very tough, yet ultra-lightweight structures using continuous carbon-fibre-reinforced-polymers (CFRP) in a filament winding process creating ultralight 3D structures. The carbon fibre is coated with a polymer that solidifies the entire object rendering it extremely solid and resilient. Impregnated carbon fibres are wound to form an optimised 3D-mesh design that gives the part its special mechanical properties.

The joint lab, hosted in LIST’s new premises in Hautcharage, will focus on two projects, known as “xFKin3D” (the name of the technology) and “Robotised xFKin3D”.
While the first one consists of making parts by hand with the filament weaving manually and will target the demonstration space-use standards of structural parts produced by the xFKin3D technology, the second one aims at producing the same parts, but with the use of a new robotic arm recently installed at LIST. This will make it a fully automated manufacturing process, assuring excellent repeatability, to the same strength and quality, but on a larger, industrial scale.

Researchers from the joint lab ©LIST
The end products are for aerospace, but what exactly? 

The components produced are destined for use in all that is antenna support, bracket for equipment in satellites. Currently many of these parts are metallic and therefore relatively heavy. The aim is to move away from metal parts, and with this new technology by LIST and Gradel produced in Luxembourg, a reduction of up to 75% in weight can be achieved, saving companies considerable costs.

It has already been confirmed that the final clients for parts produced at LIST premises, will be initially for Airbus, Thales and OHB – three major European players in the space industry.

When it comes to commercialising parts produced in the LIST labs, it is Gradel who will take on this task with an already proven track record in producing products for the space industry.

LIST will contribute its expertise in the formation of the materials and play a major role at the start and of the process and development, researching and determining such things as the correct conditions, speed, printing, pressure, temperature etc, needed to obtain parts of strong and good quality.

“Setting up joint laboratory and development program to support innovative Luxembourg company is at the very heart of our LIST mission ” said Dr Damien Lenoble, director of the Materials Research and Technology – MRT Department of LIST adding that “advanced research towards ultra-light-weighting with sustainable materials and processes is one our CORE research area in MRT, acknowledging that targeting leading-edge requirements of the space industry together with GRADEL will pave the way for timely energy-efficient terrestrial applications that go from wind turbines to ultra-light transport vehicles”.

Regarding the new collaboration with LIST, Gradel’s Managing Director, Claude Maack stated, “Gradel began working with Ultra Lightweight structures in the space sector in 2018 by signing an exclusivity contract with AMC GmbH which developed xFK in 3D first in the Automotive sector. Now with LIST we have a strong partner with deep knowledge in material and process of composite structures allowing us further qualification for Space applications. Supported by LSA, this innovative process technology will enable Gradel to continue its success story in Space sector and beyond with a full automated manufacturing process”.

A disruptive technology with potential applications in the space field, and beyond 

Light-weighting is a popular topic in today’s world, and becoming more and more important in many areas of production, notably in the automotive and aeronautic world. The heavier a car is, the more it consumes. If you manage to halve the weight of a vehicle, you halve the energy necessary to move it. This technology is currently being applied to space technologies, in the future it could equally be as beneficial for aircraft and automobile industries.

Both projects are supported by the Luxembourg National Space Programme LuxIMPULSE, which aims at providing funding to help companies established in Luxembourg to bring innovative ideas to market. The programme is managed by the Luxembourg Space Agency (LSA) together with the European Space Agency (ESA).

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Industrial & Service Transformation Inside Research Luxembourg Latest news

Luxembourg teams up with 4 countries to create the European Space University for Earth and Humanity

Five young and mature universities, including the University of Luxembourg, created the alliance UNIVERSEH: the European Space University for Earth and Humanity.
UNIVERSEH will be officially launched on 14 December 2020.

The event is taking place online; registrations are open.

Save the date: Liftoff of UNIVERSEH on 14 December 2020

UNIVERSEH, unites over 130.977 students, 13.030 staff and 59 associates. With a focus on “Space”, the Alliance will work towards the following goals:

Enhance mobility and multilingualism

UNIVERSEH will enhance current support services and develop common ones such as the “Feel at Home” program. Further, the alliance will develop mobility opportunities, create new partnerships and organize short term mobility. It will also promote and facilitate access to different language courses, diversify the offer and contribute to developing students’ tandems.

Develop new joint Interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral curricula

UNIVERSEH will involve different stakeholders; collect information on the current and future needs, then, based on courses from the alliance, UNIVERSEH will create new interdisciplinary curricula.

Develop new pedagogical models

We will explore new innovative opportunities: personal learning networks, hybrid and virtual learning and student to student learning

Become an entrepreneurial “university”

UNIVERSEH will develop new common entrepreneurship courses adapted to European space sector, develop different activities such as call for project with stakeholders, support to students’ projects, networking and mentoring program, student practical experience in research and innovation infrastructures. All the actions will be supported by a strong Business-University cooperation.

Address some of the barriers students can face when it comes to joining higher education in general and studying abroad in particular

The alliance will produce a EuroCharter on Equity, Inclusion and Diversity: towards European standards, testimonial videos of Women in the Space sector, a blog for students with specific needs to enable them to share experiences and staff seminar for common guidelines and improvement of services for mobile students.

UNIVERSEH logo

Established in November 2020 to develop a new way of collaboration in the field of Space within the new “European Universities” initiative promoted by the European Commission, UNIVERSEH aims to create new higher education interactive experiences for the university community, teachers and students, and for the benefit of society as a whole. Such initiatives will enable broadminded, informed and conscientious European citizens to capture and create new knowledge and become smart actors of European innovation, valorisation and societal dissemination within the Space sector, from science, engineering, liberal arts to culture.

In all its aspects (science, engineering, economy, business, social and human sciences, patenting and innovation, entrepreneurship, science and medicine, art and culture), UNIVERSEH will contribute to European Education area, to job and industrial growth, to resolve key societal challenges, and to make the space sector more sustainable, to ensure that the EU remains a global leader in the New Space domain.

Partners of the alliance

Learn more on UNIVERSEH’s website: https://universeh.eu/