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Luxembourg a leader in the EU for internet quality

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Digital Quality of Life Index 2021.

According to the 2021 Digital Quality of Life index, Luxembourg scores high globally in terms of internet quality, e-infrastructure and mobile broadband growth.

What’s the digital quality of life like in Luxembourg? Where does the country stand in Europe and globally?

The 2021 Digital Quality Life index assesses 110 countries on the quality of a digital well-being. The global research, which covers 90% of the global population, is calculated by looking at the impact of five core pillars: internet affordability, internet quality, e-infrastructure, e-security, and e-government.

Luxembourg ranks high in internet quality, e-infrastructure and mobile speed growth

For the first time, Luxembourg has taken part in the Digital Quality Life index. Overall, the country ranked 15th and 10th in Europe in the study conducted by cybersecurity company Surfshark.

@2021 Digital Quality of Life Index

In the 2021 index, Luxembourg has the highest internet quality in the EU and the sixth highest in the world. The country also has the fastest mobile speed growth in the world and the second highest mobile internet stability.

@2021 Digital Quality of Life Index

As for e-infrastructure, Luxembourg ranks 9th globally, behind Germany and ahead of the UK.

@2021 Digital Quality of Life Index

What our researchers say

A post doctoral researcher in the Bioinformatics Core group of the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) at the University of Luxembourg, Dr Soumyabrata Ghosh highlighted the high digital quality of life in Luxembourg.

“I like Luxembourg a lot. It is a nice and welcoming place to stay. Life is peaceful and internet bandwidth is high.”

Dr Soumyabrata Ghosh, researcher in the Bioinformatics Core group of the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) at the University of Luxembourg

Read Soumyabrata Ghosh‘s complete interview.

More about the 2021 Digital Quality Life index.

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The University of Luxembourg reached its highest ever score in research

The University of Luxembourg achieved its highest ever score in the categories of research and industrial income. In terms of international outlook, it scored an astounding 99.5. A research-oriented university With a score of 39.2 in the research category, The University of Luxembourg achieved its best performance ever. In comparison, it is on a par…

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University of Luxembourg: 20th top young university

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About Luxembourg Latest news

The University of Luxembourg reached its highest ever score in research

Times Higher Education Rankings.

The University of Luxembourg ranks among the top 18% of universities evaluated in the new World University Ranking 2022 published by Times Higher Education.

The University of Luxembourg achieved its highest ever score in the categories of research and industrial income. In terms of international outlook, it scored an astounding 99.5.

A research-oriented university

With a score of 39.2 in the research category, The University of Luxembourg achieved its best performance ever. In comparison, it is on a par with Politecnico di Milano and Pompeu Fabra University.

Its ambition to produce top-class research output, addressing society’s challenges through interdisciplinary approaches is paying off.

@THE World University Rankings 2022

A world leader in international outlook

Standing at 99.5 in the International Outlook category, the University of Luxembourg confirms its leadership in the world.

This area is based on the ability of a university to attract undergraduates, postgraduates and faculty from all over the planet is key to its success on the world stage. Another indicator calculates the proportion of a university’s total relevant publications that have at least one international co-author and reward higher volumes.

A top 300 university

In the World University Rankings, the University of Luxembourg ranks among the 251-300 best universities among the top 1,662 universities worldwide.

The world ranking of universities is based on scores assigned in five categories: Teaching, Research, Citations, Industry income, International outlook.

Explore THE World University Rankings 2022

More about the University of Luxembourg

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Luxembourg a leader in the EU for internet quality

What’s the digital quality of life like in Luxembourg? Where does the country stand in Europe and globally? The 2021 Digital Quality Life index assesses 110 countries on the quality of a digital well-being. The global research, which […]

Towards 2030: How Luxembourg is transforming?

Second largest patenting country per 100,000 inhabitants According to IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2021 and the Luxembourg Chamber of Commerce, R&D personnel rose from 9.34 per 1,000 inhabitants to 9.60 between 2020 and 2021. As such, Luxembourg ranks […]

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Blockchain: Luxembourg to create a wallet for digital diplomas

EBSILUX.

The technology will increase transparency and trust between schools, universities, students and employers. It will also fight the impact of fake degrees on educators.

Using blockchain to develop cross-border services will allow public administrations to check information, and improve their trustworthiness.

Luxembourg’s Ministry for Digitalisation, Infrachain, the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT), and the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST) have partnered to develop the EBSILUX Project.

A broader use of Blockchain based cross-border services in Europe

Luxembourg has put student mobility, multilingualism and international cooperation high on its agenda. In such conditions, developing an interoperable and cross-border solution is essential for the country. Digital diplomas address widespread concerns about the lack of ease and “digital literacy” of users, as they are generally delivered to a young and educated part of Luxembourg’s residents. The EBSILUX project will create a wallet for digital diplomas.

Benefits of such a wallet are manifold. First, such an interoperable, cross-border solution will encourage the use of academic certificate records in Luxembourg to provide transparency and trust between schools/universities, students and employers. The solution will make the most of digital identity, distributed ledger and mechanism for digital verifiable credentials/presentations.

It will also strengthen reputation of schools and universities by eliminating the risk of falsified diplomas.

As for student mobility, certified academic credentials can be available and shared anytime anywhere. Such a solution saves a lot of time when it comes to accessing these credentials.

Finally, employers can instantly check the validity of diplomas of their job candidates, leading to a faster recruitment procedure.

What the Diplomas use case supports

Requesting a credential for a given digital identity

Authenticating public entities via digital signature

Storing the credential privately using a self-sovereign wallet

Presenting the credential as a digital verifiable presentations with digital signature

Recording the transaction of presentation on the distributed ledger

The EBSILUX project is integrating Luxembourg into the European Blockchain Service Infrastructure (EBSI) and implementing a European EBSI use case at national level.

With EBSILUX, public and private sector work together as a community to push the adoption curve of blockchain and make blockchain operational in Europe

Read more about EBSILUX

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Luxembourg’s research community committed to Open Access

Open Access.

Open Access is the immediate, online, free availability of research outputs without any restrictions on use commonly imposed by publisher copyright agreements.

Open Access is essential to accelerate academic innovation processes while improving the visibility of research results.

Recently, Bibliothèque Nationale du Luxembourg, the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH), the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST), as well as the Luxembourg National Research Fund (FNR) strengthened their commitment to Open Access, reaching a publishing agreement with open access publisher Frontiers. The aim is to help streamline and simplify operations for eligible authors.

Opening science to the largest

Open Access publications contribute to a more efficient use of research results, boost the potential for innovation, increase the visibility of researchers and their research institutions, and create better conditions for a return on investment of public money.

Thanks to the recent agreement, participating institutions and their researchers are Plan S compliant. Plan S is a multi-funder open access mandate, which from January 2021 required all scientific articles that result from research funded by public grants to be published immediately open access in compliant venues.

Open Access fund by FNR

The FNR policy is part of the global transition to Open Access and the national Open Access policy that is supported by all major research institutions.

To help grantees comply with this policy, the FNR designed guidelines and a dedicated Open Access fund. This funding instrument is intended to provide compensation for article processing costs that may result from the open access publication of peer-reviewed results of research funded or co-funded by the FNR.

Discover FNR OPEN ACCESS FUND

Read details about National Library of Luxembourg and Frontiers strike national Open Access publishing agreement

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About Luxembourg Industrial & Service Transformation Latest news

France-Luxembourg space cooperation to focus on exploration and resources

Quadripartite agreement.

French government space agency CNES, the Luxembourg Space Agency, the European Space Resources Innovation Centre and Air Liquide confirmed their commitment to work together on developing research and technology activities. In the months ahead, the four partners will be collaborating on research projects encompassing space exploration and in situ resource utilisation.

A first workshop between French government space agency CNES and Luxembourg Space Agency (LSA) identified joint initiatives aiming in particular to address the challenges and opportunities arising out of developments in space exploration. At the same time, LSA, the European Space Resources Innovation Centre (ESRIC) and Air Liquide, drawing on a 50-year heritage of handling gases in space, engaged discussions with a view to collaborating on production and use of gases produced from in situ space resources.

Developing the space ecosystem

Multilateral discussions subsequently confirmed a shared interest in working together in areas such as in situ production and storage of oxygen and hydrogen, production and storage of hydrogen energy in space and on the lunar surface, technologies for life support, and the refueling of satellites and launchers in orbit.

ESRIC is a young initiative like no other in Europe, powered by LSA and the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST), with ESA as a strategic partner. We believe this new collaboration between France and Luxembourg will be instrumental in developing our centre and we’re delighted to be working with players like CNES and Air Liquide.”

Mathias Link, ad-interim Director of ESRIC

CNES, LSA, ESRIC and Air Liquide are in discussions to form within the 2022 timeframe joint teams to work on concrete research projects aimed at developing key technologies for in situ production and utilisation of gases required to make space exploration more viable in the long term.

These discussions come under the scope of the framework agreement signed between CNES and Luxembourg in 2009 that identifies a range of areas for cooperation including remote sensing, support for development of microsatellites by Luxembourg, innovative satellite technologies for telecommunications, materials analysis and expertise, and maritime safety.

Luxembourg, a space power

Luxembourg is a founding member of the Artemis Accords. As such the country plays central role in achieving a sustainable and robust presence on the Moon later this decade while preparing to conduct a historic human mission to Mars. These accords strengthen and put into effect the 1967 Outer Space Treaty.

The country is also home to the European Space Resources Innovation Centre (ESRIC), a joint initiative of the Luxembourg Space Agency and Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology with the European Space Agency as a strategic partner.

In 2017, Luxembourg took over as the first European country to provide a legal framework for Luxembourg-based companies to exploit space resources. This was further supported by legislation passed by the Luxembourg Parliament in December 2020.

Space-related research is part of the key research priorities, i.e. Industrial and Service Transformation. The University of Luxembourg and the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) focus on autonomous vehicles, robotics, space communications and system critical software, while LIST concentrates on material sciences, biological sciences, and Earth observing.

While waiting to go into space, see a lunar rover drive around on the moon in augmented reality with FNR LetzScience App

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About Luxembourg Covid-19 taskforce Latest news

Luxembourg comes second in dealing with COVID-19

Successful pandemic strategy.

German news site “Der Spiegel” compared and assessed the pandemic control strategies of 154 countries across the globe. Luxembourg is one of the front-runners and ranks 2nd, just behind Finland and ahead of Norway.

The analysis was based on a series of factors comprising the Stringency Index. Other aspects include excess mortality, restrictions on personal freedom, impact on the gross domestic product and vaccination progress.

Luxembourg brings Covid-19 pandemic under control

Based on these factors, Luxembourg holds the second position in the international ranking among the 154 countries analysed. Finland ranks first. Following Luxembourg are Norway, Denmark, Taiwan, and Singapore.

Finland, Luxembourg, Denmark, and Estonia are the only EU countries among the 16 countries that have weathered the crisis best.

When it comes to the stringency of the measures to contain the virus, Luxembourg ranks about in the middle, achieving a score of 45. The Stringency Index go from 0 (no measures) to 100 (high restrictions).

Luxembourg also managed to keep its economy afloat compared to the rest of the world. According to the data of the International Monetary Fund, Luxembourg deviated by -4 percent from the original GDP forecast and thus occupies 22nd place in the country ranking.

©Diese Länder haben es bisher am besten durch die Pandemie geschafft, Der Spiegel

Covid-19 Task Force – Research Luxembourg harnesses knowledge as well as human and material capacities

Since the outbreak of the pandemic, Luxembourg has implemented an extensive screening strategy including mass screening of its population and systematic screening of contacts.

With a population size of around 626,000 residents, on average every resident in Luxembourg has been tested at least 3.6 times. Luxembourg has had an overall positivity rate of 2.6% since the outbreak, while Belgium, France and Germany have had positivity rates of 8.1%, 7.4% and 5.6%, respectively.

In addition to mass screening and systematic contact tracing for SARS-CoV-2, Luxembourg has also conducted a representative serological sampling on a weekly basis among its residents since November 2020.

More about Research Luxembourg Covid-19 Task Force

Read Generalisation of COVID-19 incidences provides a biased view of the actual epidemiological situation by Paul Wilmes, Joël Mossong, Thomas G. Dentzer

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Childcare: Luxembourg stands out

A family-friendly country.

Quality childcare helps parent return to work and can also play a central role in children overall development. According to Unicef new report, Luxembourg ranks among the five highest OECD and EU countries on childcare provisions.

Unicef’s recently published ranking of 41 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and European Union (EU) countries looks at where rich countries stand on childcare.

The report assesses the countries on the amount of leave offered to new parents, the ease of access to education in early childhood, the quality of teaching and the affordability of childcare. 

Luxembourg, Iceland, Sweden, Norway and Germany top the list.

Accessible, high quality childcare

Luxembourg succeeds in providing quality of organised childcare. Indeed, the country invests a lot in early-childhood education and care.

Luxembourg stands out as it offers generous leave to both mothers and fathers, giving parents choice how to take care of their children. As a matter of fact, Luxembourg offers 20 weeks for mothers and two weeks for fathers on full pay. Additionally, parental leave includes flexible schemes from four or six month full time leave to eight or 12 months in part-time through split leave over a maximum 20 months for both parents.

However, as no country is a leader on all four fronts, there is still room
for improvement.

Well-being and health of young people in Luxembourg

According to the “National Report on the Situation of Youth in Luxembourg 2020”, published by the Ministry of Education, Children and Youth together with researchers from the University of Luxembourg, the majority of young people in Luxembourg report good well-being, good health and general satisfaction with life in Luxembourg.

Key findings

  • A trusting support of the family
  • Time spent together with friends
  • A high socio-economic status
  • Open, participation-oriented structures in schools
  • Youth work, employment and out-of-home care facilities

Young people consider themselves as quite responsible and competent actors with regard to their well-being and health. They specifically try to improve them through their actions (among others through sports and nutrition), but some of them also show harmful or risky behaviour (such as lack of exercise, unhealthy diet or alcohol consumption).

However, many young people in Luxembourg are also worried about their future, especially if they are affected by poverty and disadvantage. In addition, school stress and pressure to perform, professional integration problems as well as housing shortages and environmental degradation are key issues affecting young people’s well-being.

“The well-being and health of young people are a priority of education policy. In this area, it is essential to be able to rely on facts; our intuitions may or may not turn out to be right. In this sense, the University is a valuable partner. The report on the situation of youth will serve as a basis for the discussion that will be carried out in the weeks and months to come and which will culminate in the new national action plan on youth policy (Jugendpakt).”

Claude Meisch, Minister of Education, Children and Youth

Well-being and health differ according to age, gender and, above all, the social background of the young people. The Youth Report points out these specific problems and risks for young people, but also emphasises the manifold existing potentials of young people and the associated political and social challenges.

LISER to assess children well-being in Luxembourg

The Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research (LISER) is contributing to the “Well-being of children in Luxembourg” project, initiated by the Ministry of Education, Children and Youth.

This second survey will complement the information collected in the previous survey and will provide new information to feed public debates and political decisions in view of the next National Report on the situation of children in Luxembourg, which will be published in spring 2022 and presented to the Chamber of Deputies.

The topics addressed in the survey concern the daily life of children and cover many areas: family, friends, neighbourhood, life at school, but also leisure activities, use of new technologies, organisation of free time, the child’s personality and their future. A section is also devoted to how children have experienced this year of pandemic.

Find out the results of the National Report on the Situation of Youth in Luxembourg 2020

More about LISER survey

More about Unicef’s report : Where Do Rich Countries Stand on Childcare? A ranking of national childcare policies in wealthy countries

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University of Luxembourg: 20th top young university

University Rankings.

The University of Luxembourg has been ranked 20th in the 2021 World Young University Rankings of the Times Higher Education (THE).

Top three in international outlook category

The University of Luxembourg performed particularly high in the international outlook category, coming in third position.

Its overall score was 59.84 across the categories teaching, research, citations, industry income and international outlook.

The Young University Rankings considers universities aged 50 or younger. The top spot was occupied by Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, Paris Sciences et Lettres, in France, and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

The 2021 ranking includes more than 450 universities, up from 414 in 2020. The ranking is based on the results of the Times Higher Education World University Rankings, using weightings adjusted to the characteristics of younger universities.

Among the world’s best 250 universities

In the World University Rankings, the University of Luxembourg stands at 201-250 among the top 1,527 universities worldwide. In addition, the university ranks among the top 25% of universities in the categories Teaching, Research and Citations.

THE World University Rankings are one of the most important university rankings worldwide. Indeed, it evaluates the strengths of universities in the categories Teaching, Research, International Outlook, Industry Income and Citations based on 13 performance indicators.

International to the core

Founded in 2003, the University of Luxembourg is located on three campuses, in Belval, Kirchberg and Limpertsberg. The university brings together 6,783 students, including nearly 5,000 full-time students, who span some 130 different nationalities.

The University of Luxembourg is strongly research-oriented. It has a distinctly international outlook and its ambition is to produce top-class research output, addressing society’s challenges. It conducts cutting-edge research across multiple fields in its three faculties and three interdisciplinary research centres.

Explore THE 2021 World Young University Rankings

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Luxembourg – a strong innovator

Attractive research system.

The European innovation scoreboard 2021 shows that Luxembourg’s strengths lie in attractive research systems, human resources and intellectual assets. The top-3 indicators include foreign doctorate students, trademark applications, and international scientific co-publications.

On the 2021 European Innovation Scoreboard, which assesses the performance of countries in the field of innovation, Luxembourg is a strong innovator and stands out in attractive research system, human resources, intellectual assets indicators.

Second most attractive research system

Luxembourg ranks second most attractive research system, after Switzerland.

Luxembourg scores particularly high on Foreign doctorate students, Employment in knowledge-intensive activities, Population with tertiary education, Trademark applications, Lifelong learning, and International scientific co-publications.

EU keeps on improving innovation performance

The 2021 edition of the innovation scoreboard shows that Europe’s innovation performance continues to improve across the EU. Overall, the EU has improved its innovation performance by 12.5% since 2014. There is continued convergence within the EU, with lower-performing countries growing faster than higher-performing ones, therefore closing the innovation gap among them. 

The European innovation scoreboard provides a comparative analysis of innovation performance in EU countries, other European countries, and regional neighbours.

More about the 2021 European Innovation Scoreboard

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Towards 2030: How Luxembourg is transforming?

Luxembourg 2030

Luxembourg 2030 is underway. The Covid-19 crisis marked a slowdown on the macroeconomic level. This situation should partially change Luxembourg’s trajectory, particularly by accelerating the efforts undertaken in recent years. Thus, the economic recovery is set to focus on five growth niches, including research and development and innovation

Second largest patenting country per 100,000 inhabitants

According to IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2021 and the Luxembourg Chamber of Commerce, R&D personnel rose from 9.34 per 1,000 inhabitants to 9.60 between 2020 and 2021. As such, Luxembourg ranks 5th in this respect.

In the same vein, the number of scientific articles published in Luxembourg increased from 814 to 869.

Finally, when it comes to patents, Luxembourg is a highly attractive country. Indeed, it ranks second, behind Switzerland, for the number of patents held per 100,000 inhabitants.

Five growth niches

Luxembourg has given a new impetus to its strategy and carried out ambitious projects to maintain and strengthen the competitiveness of its economy and industries. Ensuring that the pension system is sustainable, maintaining an attractive legislative framework and strengthening social cohesion are all among the projects that Luxembourg is taking on. The main stake for the the country’s economy is to anticipate the economic world of tomorrow.

Five growth niches have been identified, with the aim of developing internationally competitive clusters based on the model of the Financial Centre.

The Luxembourg five growth niches:

biomedicine & health technologies

renewable energies & eco-technologies

logistics

space technologies

information & telecommunication technologies

The development of new growth niches should lead to a more diversified economy, of which the international financial centre would continue to be the major driver. The country’s infrastructure challenges and steady population growth will reinforce the need for greater interconnections with the Greater Region. The country should by then have become a European leader in digitalisation.

Making digitalisation happen

Digitalisation is one of the cornerstones of the global economy. For now, companies and countries at different stages of the digital transition for now. In this respect, Luxembourg has the potential to successfully complete its digital transition.

In particular, it can count on a strong orientation towards the service sector and, more generally, the structure of the different sectors of activity supporting the use of digital technologies as a supplement rather than as a substitute. According to LISER’s “Les cahiers de la Grande Région #4”, the digital transition and Work 4.0 as a whole could increase GDP per capita by 1.7% and employment by 1.0% in Luxembourg. The effect on employment would be spread between replacing 13% of jobs, creating 4.5% of digital jobs and 9.5% of non-digital jobs.

Sources from LISER’s Les relations entre l’Ostbelgien, la Wallonie et le Grand-Duché : vers un «Grand Luxembourg» ? and Luxembourg Chamber of Commerce TURNING THE CRISIS INTO AN OPPORTUNITY FOR COMPETITIVENESS

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